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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
nonfiction narrative about america. you read halberstam you get a real slice of the country. >> killed out in california by a young man in a car, what, two years ago, three years? >> yes. a car just swiped him when he was getting picked up at the airport to go give a speech and a car ran him off the side and he was killed. >> you're best? >> i would say a wonderful new biography of commodore vanderbilt, which just won the pulitzer prize, i think deservedly, for best biography of the year by a young extraordinary author named t.j. stiles who i believe did a book on jesse james, which i have not read. but the vanderbilt book is a classic. it is -- you know what a great movie does or a great play does, which is for a while it ushers you into another world with complete credibility. in this case it's a perfect blend of biography. i mean vanderbilt is a fascinating larger than life deservedly controversial figure, but it also is a history -- it's not just a life and times. you understand the transportation revolution in this country first through steamboats and then through the railroads. you u
america. god bless america god bless america >> do you realize that if you took that lettuce and tried it and smoked it, you would end up with similar problems. ♪ if you are smoking tobacco -- you could try it with the made those -- with tomatoes >> you can warn me all you want. you will not stop my leafy green fetish >> it is not the nicotine that kills, it is the smoke. it is respiratory disease. it is the smoke. it's the inhalation >> it is the smoke. it's the smoke >> the more problems we come across, the more problems we see. ♪ some companies -- >> [unintelligible] >> don't you know that this was for me? >> i carry a walking stick. >> am i crazy? am i tripping? don't stop, real talk we are going to take it to the chart. >> bring on the smoking. >> we have some breaking news. let's go to traci bird. she's got all the news >> actually -- >> i do not know what is going on. let's go to nicole. >> me? ♪ trying to get a hold of this myself. >> this is breaking news, guys. i do not have it. i will have to send it back to you. >> this is a fascinating story. we're going to get it al
't get sick. >> if you get sick in america, die quickly. that's right, republicans want you to die quickly. >> how could we not be united? >> they suggest for your father and mine to get the same treatment. [unintelligible] how can we be so heartless? >> how is the nobel peace prize decided? >> [unintelligible] >> a lot of people are asking why they elected obama. >> that are giving obama a prize for not being george bush. >> tun, tun, tun, tun, tun. >> where do you start? i forgot to ask you, where does the african-american fellow come from? >> he is a friend of ours. we work in a number of different bands. he is a great drummer that plays in a couple of bands. in "auto-tune the news no. 7," they were talking about racial politics. we brought him in to add a little contrast. >> the reason we started with politics is because i bought the green sheet and the 2008 debates were going on and on and they were about to have the first debate between obama and mccain. i pretended to be barack obama, because there was a resemblance. people might mistake me for him on the street. after that,
on -- >> [unintelligible] god bless america. >> do you realize that if you took that lettuce and tried it and smoked it, you would end up with similar problems. if you are smoking tobacco -- >> you can warm me -- warn me all you want. >> it is not the nicotine that kills, it is the smoke. it is respiratory disease. it is at the smoke. -- it is the smoke. >> it is the smoke. >> it be more problems we come across, the more problems we see. >> [unintelligible] >> don't you know that this was for me? >> i carry walking stick. >> am i crazy? we are going to take it to the chart. >> bring on the smoking. >> we have some breaking news. let's go to traci bird. >> actually, -- >> i do not know what is going on. >> me? >> these are breaking news -- this is breaking news, guys. i do not have it. i will have to send it back to you. but this is a fascinating story. >> where did you do it? >> where did you -- where did we do it? >> what did you physically do it. >> we did it on michaels bed in his apartment in new york. >> andrew and sarah are in the room, but we did not have room for them on the set. we have to mak
, there are now museums ports and the warhol. we have a lot of geniuses in our midst in america. we just do not pay that much academic scholarly attention to them because they seem to close bouras. >> are you as interested in pop culture? >> no, i am not as interested. i have great regard. i think that pop culture is a legitimate source of history in the making. it is a mirror that is held up to was. i would be more nostalgic. remember the day that elvis died was the day that journalism changed in america. that evening, famously, walter cronkite did not lead the evening news with the death of elvis presley. i think that the other networks did. cronkite was the only one. a purist that the traditional view that this is not news. clearly the trend cents. >> back then, you had a magic bus that went around the united states with kids in it and you took it to many spots. >> i went to the university of new orleans and continued the majic bus program. we took students on these semester's across america where we would go to nebraska or california and walk martin luther king's path in atlanta. i star
's now museums towards andy warhol. we have a lot of geniuses in our midst right now in america that we just don't pay that much kind of academic scholarly attention to because they seem too close for us. >> mr. smith -- >> yes, what today is popular culture is tomorrow's history. >> are you as interested in pop culture as -- >> no. no, i'm not as interested. i mean i have -- i have great regard for doug's work and i think he's right, that pop culture is a legitimate, you know, source of history in the making. in many ways it's a mirror in a lot of ways held up to us. i would be, i suppose, more nostalgic in the sense that i was going to say remember the day elvis died was the day journalism changed in america because that evening, famously, walter cronkite did not lead on the evening news with the death of elvis presley. i believe the other networks did. i think he -- cronkite was the only one, a purist who took the traditional view that this isn't news. clearly the trend since suggests otherwise. i'm not altogether comfortable with the trend, but i acknowledge the historical significa
and will continue to say, a nation's population is its greatest natural resource. and i think that america has, over the last 30 or 40 years, has accepted a level of ongoing incompetents because it cost a lot of money. but on the world stage, it is not want to work much longer. >> this is something we recorded in 1996. you said then that you were a radical tighttan. does that work for you today? >> i think so. i think i am more that than i was then. >> what do you mean by radical? >> i have a basic disdain for the republicans and for the democrats, for the right end for the left. -- and for the left. so i try to not align myself with either one because i do not trust either one. history teaches us that anything can be corrupting, anything can be done in an incorrect way, anybody can follow a failed policy. and so to automatically assume that somebody on the left is correct or someone on the right is correct, i think that is nie. but the republicans have convinced me of one thing over the last your two, and that is -- when you sellout to loan it takes purely for votes -- to lunatics purely 4 vote sai
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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